New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Algiers Point

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOLA’s Algiers Point neighborhood is a a quiet suburb on the Mississippi River’s West Bank. Coined Algiers Point in the 1970’s, it’s known for its quaint houses, small art galleries, the open-air concerts at Algiers Ferry Landing and its three miles of walking and biking trails along its riverfront, the perfect stretch for picnics and enjoying great views of the New Orleans skyline.

The City Planning Commission defines the area as approximately 50 city blocks bounded by Opelousas Avenue, Pacific Avenue and the river. Some houses in Algiers Point predate the Civil War, though most of the houses were built after the fire of 1985 destroyed much of the original housing.

Algiers Point History

Algiers was part of the land grant given to New Orleans founder Jean Baptiste LeMoyne, Sieur de Bienville by the Company of the Indies in 1719. Before being annexed to New Orleans in 1970, Algiers was a bustling town with its own governance and thriving economy. The Algiers-Canal Street Ferry began operating in 1827, and has been in continuous operation ever since. The area became known for shipbuilding, repair and other riverfront endeavors, and by the 1850’s, rail yards lining the riverside employed many of the town’s residents. At its height, Algiers Point operated six separate ferries to New Orleans’ East Bank, including one capable of carrying livestock and railroad cars.

The town was built on the site of the Duverje Plantation, which was subdivided by its owner around 1839. The plantation home, built in 1812, became the Algiers Courthouse, but was ultimately destroyed by the fire of 1895. The fire also leveled several blocks of the original neighborhood, demolishing much of the early architecture.

Algiers Point Today

While some early buildings still exist, including several Greek Revival, Italianate and Victorian styles, the District is now largely comprised of early 20th century architectural styles.

Given its long history as an independent municipality, Algiers Point retains a small-town atmosphere, largely independent from the bustle of the French Quarter and the rest of the city despite its close proximity. Today, it’s a favorite for local musicians and artists. Some even refer to it as “the Brooklyn of New Orleans.”

Landmarks and Events

Some great locations to visit in Algiers Point include:

Cafes, Restaurants and Bars

Homey pubs and restaurants are a staple in Algiers Point:

Algiers Point has something for everyone. If the lovely old oak trees and pastel cottages don’t charm you, the parks, restaurants and galleries certainly will. Check out the rest of my neighborhood series to learn about other great areas in New Orleans.

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New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Algiers Point

New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Central Business District

Photo by Antrell Williams/Flickr

The Central Business District (CBD) is a major center for commerce, economics, and business in its downtown hub of perpetual activity. The neighborhood also acts as the central seat of government in New Orleans. Considered by some to be a subdistrict of the French Quarter, its boundaries are bordered by Iberville, Canal, and Decatur Streets to its north and the Mississippi River to its east. Major sites like the New Orleans Morial Convention Center, Magazine Street, and the Pontchartrain Expressway consolidate its boundaries to the south. In addition, South Claiborne Avenue, Cleveland, and Derbigny Streets shelter its western borders.

Today, the neighborhood is a dynamic part of everyday New Orleans life.  comprising skyscrapers, professional offices, neighborhood and boutique retails stores, and various restaurants and clubs. Many residents inhabit restored and historic commercial properties.

History

The neighborhood was originally developed as a residential hub called Faubourg Ste. Marie or the St. Mary Suburb in the 18th century. It’s plated streets were the first signs of expansion beyond the original French Quarter district. After the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, major investments began developing in the neighborhood as numerous people from the United States flocked to New Orleans giving the district the nickname, “The American Sector”. While Canal Street was the original dividing line between the traditional St. Mary district and the French Quarter, Canal Street is legally considered to be a part of both neighborhoods today. Throughout the 1800s and early 1900s, the Central Business District progressed upon developments without any pause. By the middle of the 1900s, the majority of professional offices in the city were located downtown, distinguishing the neighborhood as a well-developed, central business hub with accessible public transit systems.

Canal Street was a major retail hotspot for locals and residents in surrounding regions. Local and regional department stores included  Maison Blanche, Gus Mayer, Godchaux’s, D.H. Holmes, Krauss, and Kreeger’s served as the major outlets for popular retailers at the time including Adler’s Jewelry, Rubenstein Bros., and Werlein’s Music. Theaters and bookstores decorated the streets with neon marquees and multi-colored lights. Famous spots included the Saenger, RKO Orpheum, Joy, Loews State, and Civic theaters.

Further developments continued into the 1950s-1960s. A six-lane Loyola Avenue was constructed as part of the Elk Place extension, cutting through low-income residential areas and originally housing the city’s new civic center complex. In the late 1960s, Poydras Street was widened to create another six-lane central area circulator for traffic and to accommodate high-rise constructions. From 1973 to 1993, the City of New Orleans underwent renovations with public and private sector to spark more community participation. Today, luxury properties such as FourWindsNOLA and Four Seasons Hotel have helped to bring more development, security, and appeal to the district.

Close to the Mississippi River holds The Warehouse District which was heavily home to many warehouses and manufacturing buildings before the advent of containerized shipping. During the 1984 World’s Fair, the area drew renewed interest in the somewhat derelict district. As a result, heavy redevelopment began in the area. Many of the old warehouses have now been converted to boutique hotels, trendy restaurants, condos, and art galleries. As a local or visitor to New Orleans, the CBD is a must-see spot where much of the action and attractions lie.

Landmarks:

Museums/Attractions:

Luckily, much of the business district escaped major destruction during Hurricane Katrina as it lies on higher ground. The bustling center, home to the best of art, culture, and everyday business is a great way to preserve the memories of the past and the forward direction that New Orleans has been making the past decade.

New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Central Business District