New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Carrollton

Carrollton boasts a noteworthy presence among the historic buildings and avenues of New Orleans. As a significant area of Uptown New Orleans, the neighborhood includes the Carrollton Historic District, recognized by the Historic District Landmark Commission.

Although it used to be its own village, Carrollton lies far upriver, but is still lies in easy proximity to the French Quarter. It’s boundaries consist of downriver Jefferson Parish, the Mississippi River, Fig Street, and Lowerline Street.

History

During the American Civil War, Carrollton was quickly seized by Union control where soldiers were known to be heavy drinkers under the command of General John W. Phelps. At that time, General Benjamin F. Butler issued order that forbade the sale of liquor. However, Andrew J. Butler — the General’s brother — persuaded him to lift the ban. Afterwards, Andrew benefited from the lucrative liquor trade, helping the small, local economy expand. In addition, local cattle was brought in from Texas and products like flour from the North. Butler quickly established a monopoly on groceries, medicines, and necessities brought into the New Orleans neighborhood.

Current Day

The neighborhood’s main street is Carrollton Avenue which is lined with beautiful Southern oaks and includes features such as the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar running on the central median. Tulane University and Loyola University New Orleans are located just three blocks below the neighborhood allowing many students, staff, and faculty to support the local businesses of Carrollton. In addition to the two main streets of Carrollton and Saint Charles Avenue, the neighborhood also hosts two traditional neighborhood main streets that are feature both mixed residential and commercial use. On Maple Street, the neighborhood offers numerous restaurants, coffee salons, bars, and upscale shops. Upper Carrollton also features Oak Street, a busy center for moderately larger businesses that range from restaurants, live music venues like the Maple Leaf Bar to hardware stores. In the Northern Carrollton section, Palmer Park hosts moderately-sized live music festivals every year. In the park, memorials to Carolltonians who died in World War I is featured as another remnant of the neighborhood’s historical ties.

One historic section that guests should appreciate while in the area is the “Black Pearl”, a 20th century predominately African-American part of Carrollton along the riverfront. The Queen of Gospel music, Mahalia Jackson, was a prominent player from this area. In the late 1800s, Carrollton was the site of the Rising Sun Hall which was a building used for Social Aid and Pleasure Club meetings, used for dances and functions. It is thought that it was the inspiration for the famous 1960’s song “The House of the Rising Son” by The Animals.

Historically, the neighborhood became home to a melange of ethnicities including German, Irish, and numerous European settlers in the 19th century. In addition, freed slaves were able to own homes in this area before the Civil War.

Landmarks and Restaurants:

As you stroll throughout this elegant community, you will find remnants of strong community ties, history, and a united pride in ethnic heritage. It’s easy to reminisce about the historical events that have come to call Carrollton home. Enjoy the eclectic landscape that the area has to offer!

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New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Carrollton

New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Algiers Point

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NOLA’s Algiers Point neighborhood is a a quiet suburb on the Mississippi River’s West Bank. Coined Algiers Point in the 1970’s, it’s known for its quaint houses, small art galleries, the open-air concerts at Algiers Ferry Landing and its three miles of walking and biking trails along its riverfront, the perfect stretch for picnics and enjoying great views of the New Orleans skyline.

The City Planning Commission defines the area as approximately 50 city blocks bounded by Opelousas Avenue, Pacific Avenue and the river. Some houses in Algiers Point predate the Civil War, though most of the houses were built after the fire of 1985 destroyed much of the original housing.

Algiers Point History

Algiers was part of the land grant given to New Orleans founder Jean Baptiste LeMoyne, Sieur de Bienville by the Company of the Indies in 1719. Before being annexed to New Orleans in 1970, Algiers was a bustling town with its own governance and thriving economy. The Algiers-Canal Street Ferry began operating in 1827, and has been in continuous operation ever since. The area became known for shipbuilding, repair and other riverfront endeavors, and by the 1850’s, rail yards lining the riverside employed many of the town’s residents. At its height, Algiers Point operated six separate ferries to New Orleans’ East Bank, including one capable of carrying livestock and railroad cars.

The town was built on the site of the Duverje Plantation, which was subdivided by its owner around 1839. The plantation home, built in 1812, became the Algiers Courthouse, but was ultimately destroyed by the fire of 1895. The fire also leveled several blocks of the original neighborhood, demolishing much of the early architecture.

Algiers Point Today

While some early buildings still exist, including several Greek Revival, Italianate and Victorian styles, the District is now largely comprised of early 20th century architectural styles.

Given its long history as an independent municipality, Algiers Point retains a small-town atmosphere, largely independent from the bustle of the French Quarter and the rest of the city despite its close proximity. Today, it’s a favorite for local musicians and artists. Some even refer to it as “the Brooklyn of New Orleans.”

Landmarks and Events

Some great locations to visit in Algiers Point include:

Cafes, Restaurants and Bars

Homey pubs and restaurants are a staple in Algiers Point:

Algiers Point has something for everyone. If the lovely old oak trees and pastel cottages don’t charm you, the parks, restaurants and galleries certainly will. Check out the rest of my neighborhood series to learn about other great areas in New Orleans.

New Orleans Neighborhood Series: Algiers Point